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Author Topic: Chicken and Eggs  (Read 1430 times)

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Bubbles

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Chicken and Eggs
« on: January 30, 2015, 04:37:38 AM »
I am from the Philippines, 42 years old, female.  Had my skin allergy testing last February 2014, since skin allergy testing here is very limited I was only tested for 27 allergens. 
Panel I :
Chicken ( - ), Pork ( - ), Beef ( - ), Whole Egg ( - ), Cow Milk ( - ), Soy Beans ( - ), Garlic ( - ), Onion ( - ), Peanut ( - ), Banana ( - ), Carrot ( - ), Catfish ( - ), Tuna ( - ), Salmon ( - ), Shrimp ( + ), Crab ( - )
Panel II :
Cockroach ( - ), Mosquito ( + ), Dust Mites ( + ), Feather Mix ( - ), Alternaria Tenuis ( - ),
Aspergillus Fumigatus ( - ), Rough Pigweed ( - ), Acacia ( - ), Cat ( - ), Dog ( + )
Our house is quite old and made of wood so dust mites I’m sure are all over the place even though we maintain to keep the house clean and dust free.  I am taking cetirizine 10mg everyday since 2009 because of the constant itching and rashes that comes and goes from time to time.  Most people say that if you have allergies you must not eat chicken, eggs and fish since it will make you itch more because they have high histamine content. I am just wondering…should I refrain from eating chicken and eggs even if I am not allergic to them since they might contribute to the itching?

Offline PurpleCat

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Re: Chicken and Eggs
« Reply #1 on: January 30, 2015, 07:28:00 AM »
I've never heard that statement and our allergist has never told my daughter this.  What does your allergist tell you?  Do the people who tell you this have the same situation as you?

My daughter eats chicken at least 3 times a week and we eat lots of fish.  Her eczema, asthma, and allergies are well controlled and she is rarely itchy - at this point any itching is mostly when she is sweating playing sports or dancing.  Sometimes she will get itchy from skin contact with other peoples lotions, sunscreens, etc....

With regard to your dustmite allergy, have you considered your bedding?  In my opinion, that is the first place to start.  Be sure your mattress and pillow are encased and you wash your sheets often (once a week works for my daughter) so you get a good night's sleep.

Offline CMdeux

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Re: Chicken and Eggs
« Reply #2 on: January 30, 2015, 10:49:20 AM »
IF you had a histamine control done at the same time as your other skin testing, what did that look like?

That is, you should have had a + control (histamine) and a - one (saline)-- along with all of that other stuff.

What did those two things look like on your skin test?

Because that, it seems to me, is likely to tell you whether or not you need to be concerned about being hyper-reactive to histamine triggers.  It seems that this can be a cause of itching and chronic urticaria, though the link hasn't been anything like proven.

Also-- have you tried other meds?  Cetirizine isn't necessarily a good controller for chronic itching/urticaria.  Some people find that Allegra (fexofenadine) works much better to control these particular symptoms.  Be sure to talk to your doc about that possibility.

I, too, would focus on those environmental triggers that you have reason to know are a problem-- dustmite and dogs.

dustmites

turn sweeping, vacuuming, dusting over to someone ELSE, and wash bedding weekly in HOT water.  Get rid of (or encase/cover) anything upholstered that you spend any time in contact with.  Furnishings, carpet, etc. 


Dog

get any dogs out of your home-- failing that, keep them off of furnishings, and OUT OUT OUT of sleeping areas.
Resistance isn't futile.  It's voltage divided by current. 

Western U.S.

guess

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Re: Chicken and Eggs
« Reply #3 on: January 30, 2015, 11:12:29 AM »
Can you take a flight to Taiwan for testing?  They do have decent allergy institutions in the bigger hospitals there.  A few of the doctors will have English if Mandarin is a problem but I can find the clinic if you want it.  The one big name doctor I know of is a pediatric allergist he's apt to have a colleague that sees adults.

I might be able to find one in Hong Kong.  Singapore has quite a few, most regionally can help with dust mites (temperate and tropical) and associated rhinitis.  The pollen season may be hitting you really hard, too.

Bubbles

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Re: Chicken and Eggs
« Reply #4 on: January 30, 2015, 06:14:42 PM »
Thanks for replying guys. My allergist told me that i can eat chicken breast once a week and also i can eat just the yolk of the egg.

I am changing my bed sheet weekly and also i am ironing my matress as well everytime i change sheets. I dont have a dog but i have 3 cats..i was so relieved knowing that i am not allergic to cats because there is no way i am getting rid of them.

I was not tested for histamine control i think cause it was nit written on the results.

I think we have better allergy testing in manila but it is just too costly and my insurance wont cover it.

As of now i am living in my own so i have no choice but to do the sweeping and dusting myself. I broke into hives last 2009 after drinking loratadine...never had hives since then. My rashes now are just little tiny bumps on arms...some are red some are skin colored..but weird cause not all of them are itchy..just a few...can this be keratosis pilaris?


Bubbles

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Re: Chicken and Eggs
« Reply #5 on: January 30, 2015, 07:51:26 PM »
Just wanna ask also...if eating processed foods and canned goods make my allergies worst?

Offline CMdeux

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Re: Chicken and Eggs
« Reply #6 on: January 30, 2015, 09:32:56 PM »
My allergist told me that i can eat chicken breast once a week and also i can eat just the yolk of the egg.


???


WHY??


You don't seem to have any history that would really suggest that those things need to be out of your diet, do you?  I mean, you have negative skin tests.  That is at least 95% predictive of you having NO allergic response to them at all.


If you don't remember your histamine control, then you probably don't need to worry about foods that might be high in it.  Believe me, if you were dermatologically hypersensitive to histamine, you'd know it after a skin test that included a positive control.    It would be very memorable.  The fact that it isn't is pretty suggestive that this isn't the problem.

I'm not sure that I'd be too trusting of a doc that wants you to limit your intake of something you aren't demonstrably allergic to-- particularly when that something is a thing that you have a negative skin test to on a skin testing session where you DID definitely respond to other allergens.

Does that make sense?








Resistance isn't futile.  It's voltage divided by current. 

Western U.S.

guess

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Re: Chicken and Eggs
« Reply #7 on: January 31, 2015, 10:59:03 AM »
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3651140/?report=classic

Try tracing some of the allergists, clinics, and universities mentioned.  They are part of the global allergy associations and most likely to adhere to current best practices in allergy and immunology yet still understand the needs unique to local population.

Bubbles

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Re: Chicken and Eggs
« Reply #8 on: February 03, 2015, 07:11:22 PM »
Really makes a lot of sense...thanks so much for replying guys...really appreciate it :)

Offline Janelle205

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Re: Chicken and Eggs
« Reply #9 on: February 04, 2015, 03:46:18 PM »
If shellfish has been a big part of your diet, I'd want to find an allergist that is willing to explore with you if that is a 'true' allergy or perhaps a false positive test result because of your dust mite allergy.
Allergic to soy, egg, tomato, apple, cherry, peach, pear, nectarine, canteloupe, watermelon, severe OAS to others, insect bites (severe to horseflies), various drugs, way too many environmental allergens, and asthma.