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Author Topic: maisie durant exercise induced + nut anaphylaxis  (Read 2518 times)

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Offline eragon

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Its OK to have dreams:one day my kids will be legal adults & have the skills to pick up a bath towel.

Offline YouKnowWho

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Re: maisie Durant
« Reply #1 on: February 02, 2015, 02:36:24 PM »
:(

But can I ask - her nut allergy was well contained by tablets?  Does that mean Benadryl and no epi pen or am I missing something?
DS1 - Wheat, rye, barley and egg
DS2 - peanuts
DD -  tree nuts, soy and sunflower
Me - bananas, eggplant, many drugs
Southeast USA

Offline spacecanada

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Re: maisie Durant
« Reply #2 on: February 02, 2015, 04:24:49 PM »
That's how it sounds to me too.  :(
anaphylaxis to tree nuts, peanuts, potato, and wheat

Offline eragon

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Re: maisie Durant
« Reply #3 on: February 02, 2015, 04:44:53 PM »
yes, just antihistamines.
have met plenty of people with nut allergy and no epi pens.
Its OK to have dreams:one day my kids will be legal adults & have the skills to pick up a bath towel.

Offline starlight

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Re: maisie Durant
« Reply #4 on: February 02, 2015, 08:02:52 PM »
yes, just antihistamines.
have met plenty of people with nut allergy and no epi pens.

I just don't understand. I understand that there is a ridiculously low number of allergists over there, but are British people less likely to google their medical conditions and find support groups? Does the media not usually report on allergy deaths? If anything, Americans over-google their medical conditions, so I'm just really confused at the lack of education I'm perceiving is happening over there....  :-/

Offline eragon

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Re: maisie Durant
« Reply #5 on: February 03, 2015, 07:47:07 AM »
 less allergists, and unaware GPs and peads who know little about allergy.

GPs dont automatically think epi pen when they hear or see an allergy.

other issue is that its seen as 'just a rash' and isnt something to worry about. people assume mild allergy based on previous reaction history.


Currently we have similar issue with one of our children, who is under the correct and best medical care in UK and they havent given her any epi pens for her milk allergy. Based on her low skin prick tests, despite having some moderate reactions in combination with other allergens (complicated), we have been advised to wait and see if outgrown and avoid for now.
Even for our son with his long severe allergy list, he didnt get his epi pens until over 2, and that was after I made a song and dance about it, and GP gave me the prescription as we were adding new allergens to a ever longer growing list.  When we had next appointment with allergy clinic they heard the new list of allergens added and then wanted to give us auto injectors. This was his 2nd appointment after  the 1st which gave  us the confirmation of peanut, tree , egg and other environmental allergies.

We dont have the 2 symptom rule for administering the autoinjector as US does. Our doctors disagree with that, and take it on an individual basis. I have found this to be a huge grey area, for one, I do think there would be an over use of epi pens, and another can lead to the risk of not using an epi at all and eventual risk of death. So, in my opinion both medical attitudes of support for patients and parents in this area is sadly lacking. Greater education in recognising when anaphylaxis is staring you in the face is needed.

Its OK to have dreams:one day my kids will be legal adults & have the skills to pick up a bath towel.

Offline Macabre

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Re: maisie Durant
« Reply #6 on: February 03, 2015, 05:06:46 PM »
We do not have an overuse of epinephrine here, though. Fact is, even with the two symptom guideline, it is underused.

Here's a recent article supporting that:



 
Injectable Epinephrine: An Epidemic of Misuse
Gary J. Stadtmauer, MDDisclosures
January 20, 2015
 
An Introduction to Epinephrine Misuse and Misinformation

It's time to face the fact that there is an epidemic of miscommunication about the use of epinephrine for allergic emergencies. This is a problem among both healthcare professionals and patients. As highlighted in December by Medscape Medical News, injectable epinephrine is often not used correctly by patients during allergic emergencies. Studies have even found that most parents were afraid to use the device in their children with peanut allergy.[1]

And doctors don't get it right, either. In my own experience, epinephrine is often omitted from the emergency care of the anaphylactic patient. R.S.H. Pumphrey reported,[2] in a study, that epinephrine was administered in just 62% of the fatal anaphylactic reactions that he reviewed, with only a small minority (14%) receiving the drug before cardiac arrest.

My partner in practice once had a patient in the emergency department for hours getting fluids for hypotension (blood pressure, 80/50 mm Hg), along with antihistamines and corticosteroids as anaphylaxis management. The patient was concerned and called my partner in the middle of the night. The treating emergency physician refused to give epinephrine and challenged my partner to come in if he wanted to manage the case—which he in fact did, and the patient promptly responded to a single intramuscular dose of 0.3 mg (1:1000) epinephrine.

Injectable Epinephrine: Safe and Effective When Used Correctly

What is this reluctance to use epinephrine, and from where does it arise? In my opinion, it is out of ignorance—not just of the guidelines for anaphylaxis, but also of the physiology of epinephrine.

At-rest plasma epinephrine levels are 0.035 ng/mL.[3] Levels over 10 times that amount have been measured in persons exercising,[4] and even higher than that in people under mental stress.[5]

Incredibly, it's not uncommon for doses of epinephrine to be administered intravenously during routine dental procedures, and this is usually tolerated.[6] We need to worry much less about the potential for epinephrine side effects.

It is epinephrine underuse that has consistently been shown to be the issue in anaphylactic emergencies,[2] and overdose is actually quite rare. The standard adult dose of self-injecting epinephrine (0.3 mg of 1:1000 epinephrine) raises the level of epinephrine in the body from an average of 0.035 ng/mL to about 10 times that amount.[7] It would require more about 20 such injections to reach a toxic level.

It's also important to note that a delay in use of epinephrine is linked to fatal food anaphylaxis.[8] The other risk factor for fatal food reactions is poorly controlled asthma, a point I always make to asthmatic patients with food allergy.

Finally, patients need to understand that allergic reactions are not all alike and that the severity may be influenced by many endogenous and exogenous factors. Factors that might accentuate an immediate hypersensitivity reaction include hormones, viral infections, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, alcohol, and overheating/exercise.

To explain much of this to patients takes time. So I have developed a patient handout, which can be printed here, to help with your practice of medicine.

HANDOUT

Dear Patient:

You have been prescribed a self-injecting epinephrine device for allergic emergencies. You have probably heard about this drug before, but I want to educate you more about it, because some of what you think you know may not be correct.

Epinephrine is safe, and you already have epinephrine in your body

Epinephrine is a naturally occurring hormone. It is the hormone that is part of our fight-or-flight response. When you are scared or excited, and also when you are exercising, your epinephrine levels surge, but even when you sleep, there is a little epinephrine circulating in your body. An injection from your epinephrine device will increase your level of epinephrine to the range seen under stressful circumstances. Since you have at some point in your life experienced stress, you have already been exposed to the effects of high levels of epinephrine.

If you were given the injection right now, all that would likely happen is that your heart rate and blood pressure would increase to a moderate degree and that you might feel slightly shaky. Epinephrine is metabolized very quickly, and you would not feel this effect for long.

Why You Should Go to the Emergency Room (ER) After Using the Epinephrine

You may have been told that you have to go to the ER after using your epinephrine device. That's not because of the epinephrine; it's because the allergic reaction probably requires further monitoring. Many patients also need more than one dose of epinephrine or other emergency treatments; that may be due to the severity of the allergic reaction or simply because the device was not used correctly (the most common mistake is not holding the device against your thigh for the time required for the full dose of medication to be delivered). So a trip to the ER is the safest thing to do after using epinephrine.

Why You Should Not Wait to Use Your Epinephrine

You might hope the allergic reaction won't be "that bad," and you might be right, but it's important to know that a delay in use of epinephrine is linked to fatal food anaphylaxis. The other risk factor for fatal food reactions is poorly controlled asthma, so if you do have asthma, that is another reason to keep your asthma under good control!

Why You Should Not Be Afraid of the Epinephrine Device

The device itself might look big, but the injection needle is not. It's just like getting a flu shot. As mentioned above, the main side effect you might experience is feeling a bit shaky after using the device.


 
Medscape Allergy & Immunology © 2015  WebMD, LLC


Cite this article: Injectable Epinephrine: An Epidemic of Misuse. Medscape. Jan 20, 2015.

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« Last Edit: February 03, 2015, 08:33:35 PM by Macabre »
Me: Sesame, shellfish, chamomile, sage
DS: Peanuts

Offline spacecanada

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Re: maisie Durant
« Reply #7 on: February 03, 2015, 06:26:45 PM »
I really like that article, Mac!
anaphylaxis to tree nuts, peanuts, potato, and wheat

Offline starlight

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Re: maisie Durant
« Reply #8 on: February 03, 2015, 06:33:25 PM »
Thank you for the UK perspective, eragon. It's so interesting how different the thinking/science interpretation can be.

Offline eragon

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Its OK to have dreams:one day my kids will be legal adults & have the skills to pick up a bath towel.

Offline Mfamom

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Re: maisie durant exercise induced + nut anaphylaxis
« Reply #10 on: February 25, 2015, 09:04:21 AM »
i just read this on a facebook post.  the story is so confusing.  says her nut allergy was controlled by medication, but exercising and eating the allergen caused exercise induced anaphylaxis?  hum
http://www.ijreview.com/2015/02/257276-girls-tragic-gym-trip-will-make-people-double-check-ingredients-post-workout-snack/?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=organic&utm_content=conservativedaily&utm_campaign=Culture
When People Show You Who They Are, Believe Them.  The First Time.


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Offline Mfamom

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Re: maisie durant exercise induced + nut anaphylaxis
« Reply #11 on: February 25, 2015, 09:13:13 AM »
the comments on the link I posted show the ignorance people have about allergies....OMG
One Comment: Are some of you people so ignorant that you can't read. The article stated that she had a known nut allergy controlled by medication, this means she was able to have nuts because it slowed the process of how her body absorbed the nuts. What she didn't know was that by working out her body would absorb the nuts at an accelerated rate. THAT'S WHAT KILLED HER. The article was to educate people on the effects of working out and how it affects your food allergies.
When People Show You Who They Are, Believe Them.  The First Time.


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