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Author Topic: Medical ID with QR Code?  (Read 367 times)

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Offline Ciel

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Medical ID with QR Code?
« on: January 07, 2018, 08:29:17 PM »
I need to update my MedicAlert file but I keep putting it off because thereís a good chance I will need to update it again in the not too distant future and I donít want to pay twice. I probably should order a new bracelet as well but not until I know where things have landed because I definitely donít want to do that twice in one year. I havenít been wearing my MedicAlert so Iím looking for alternative solutions.

The idea of a bracelet that is not engraved or only engraved with minimal information appeals to me. Only the info required by EMS to stabilize a critical situation would need to be accessed immediately and once in the ER there is some time to pull up my complete medical records.

I am looking at MyID bracelets which can be engraved or not and specific condition sliders can be added for critical info. For example it might be useful to know that I have asthma and a history of anaphylaxis, but in a crisis medics donít really need to know if I have an allergy to peanuts or shrimp, or both. They do need to know that I am allergic to latex so they donít make the situation worse, so I would probably put that slider on the band.

I like this idea a lot but departing from the more traditional standards is making me hesitate. Iíve also read that these kinds of IDs will be the future. It seems so much more convenient, updates are free and unlimited which is important if medications or contact info is updated or changed, bracelets are interchangeable because you can link a new one to the same account, and they are priced lower per bracelet because there is no engraving (or minimal engraving that can move from bracelet to bracelet). It also acts as a portable health record without having to carry a binder around.

Major con for me is that I do not at all like the idea of having information engraved on the front of the bracelet, which is the only option if I want any engraving.

Online spacecanada

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Re: Medical ID with QR Code?
« Reply #1 on: January 07, 2018, 09:44:05 PM »
I doubt they have QR code readers in/on ambulances, firetrucks, or police cars.  EMS cannot use their own personal phone to scan and look up QR codes.  You'd have to call your local ambulance/fire provider and ask if that's part of their protocol or within their training to look for and read (and have the ability to look up).  Plus, the average person on the street may not have a QR code reader either.  Not everyone has a smart phone, and of those, not everyone has a QR code reader.  I'd stick with engraved critical words.  You don't have to include all allergens on the engraving either, even MedicAlert, just the critical information paramedics would need up front. 

Oh, and one bonus of metal is that they strip patients of all metal objects before doing MRIs, which makes them find metal medical jewellery in emergency trauma situations. 

I am not sure how long an engraving would last on those (silicone?) MyID bracelets or sliders either.  I guess the cost is low, so you could replace them fairly easily, as needed.  (I'm also REALLY hard on my bracelets with multiple sports, of which swimming quickly strips engraving paint form silicone bracelets - just a heads up there.)

Just my two cents, obviously.  Something to think about.  If paramedics are now looking for silicone bracelets and scanning QR codes in ambulances as standard practice, that could change my opinion.  (Unfortunately, I've heard nothing about that from my EMT and firefighter friends.)
anaphylaxis to tree nuts, peanuts, potato, and wheat

Offline GoingNuts

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Re: Medical ID with QR Code?
« Reply #2 on: January 08, 2018, 05:46:01 AM »
Replacing an engraving is one thing, but you shouldn't have to pay to update your information on file with MedicAlert.
"Speak out against the madness" - David Crosby
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Offline Ciel

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Re: Medical ID with QR Code?
« Reply #3 on: January 08, 2018, 09:34:39 AM »
GN when I enrolled with MedicAlert there was a one-time fee for a lifetime membership. They have since switched to an annual subscription fee and lifetime members were given the option of joining that programme or keeping the lifetime membership. For those that opted to keep the lifetime membership there is now a $15 fee each time we update our file. Financially that made more sense for me as I didnít think I would need to update very often. I think I have updated twice in the last 10 or even 15 years.

MedicAlert also doesnít act like a portable health record, which for me is a big plus in favour of the QR reader. It can easily be pulled up in non-emergency situations to access my medical history or my current medications, dates of past surgeries, etc...

Iím not going to cancel my MedicAlert membership if I do try the MyID for a bit. I figure that wearing something is better than nothing and my MedicAlert wonít help me if Iím not wearing it.

Offline Ciel

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Re: Medical ID with QR Code?
« Reply #4 on: January 08, 2018, 10:00:15 AM »
I doubt they have QR code readers in/on ambulances, firetrucks, or police cars.  EMS cannot use their own personal phone to scan and look up QR codes.  You'd have to call your local ambulance/fire provider and ask if that's part of their protocol or within their training to look for and read (and have the ability to look up).  Plus, the average person on the street may not have a QR code reader either.  Not everyone has a smart phone, and of those, not everyone has a QR code reader.  I'd stick with engraved critical words.  You don't have to include all allergens on the engraving either, even MedicAlert, just the critical information paramedics would need up front.

Oh, and one bonus of metal is that they strip patients of all metal objects before doing MRIs, which makes them find metal medical jewellery in emergency trauma situations. 

Yes this makes perfect sense, but what I was trying to say is that paramedics donít have time to look for wallet cards and most, if not all EMTs surveyed said they have never called the number on the bracelet on scene.They would not even be thinking about scanning a QR code or calling a hotline. They say it is ER personnel who will go through belongings and call hotlines once the patient is stabilized. If the patient is conscious and verbal they can provide the necessary info directly to first responders themselves.  They are trained to look for a bracelet on wrists and neck, and most say they do this. They get the crital info off the engraving but donít do anything further since they are busy trying to stabilize the patient.

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I am not sure how long an engraving would last on those (silicone?) MyID bracelets or sliders either.  I guess the cost is low, so you could replace them fairly easily, as needed.  (I'm also REALLY hard on my bracelets with multiple sports, of which swimming quickly strips engraving paint form silicone bracelets - just a heads up there.)

The MyID system has a metal pod that is laser engraved up to 4 lines on the front for critical words and the website, PIN number, hotline phone number and QR code are laser engraved on the back. The band itself is silicone.

Info can be accessed via QR code, website with PIN or by calling their hotline so a QR reader is not absolutely necessary and can be circumvented. But I would be able to pull up my profile during a doctor appointment or something similar. I really like this idea.

For some reason I am still hesitating before ordering one of their bracelets. It helps when other people share their perspective and thoughts. Thanks Space.

Online Janelle205

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Re: Medical ID with QR Code?
« Reply #5 on: January 08, 2018, 10:04:14 AM »
Ciel, this may or may not be an option for you, but I am cheap and have an engraved medical id without the health record, and then have medical history and then keep documents with my meds and health history on my phone and my tablet.  I don't know how well it would work if I were unconscious (though there is a note in my wallet and a sticker on my epi case mentioning it) but when I have gone to the ER or new doctors, the nurses love it - especially since I am on unusual medications that are sometimes hard to find in the computer system and they don't have to ask me to spell each one.

Not the intention of this thread, but good reminder - I need to order a new bracelet with epilepsy on it and then see if I can find mine or order a new pregnancy charm to clip on to it.
Allergic to soy, egg, tomato, apple, cherry, peach, pear, nectarine, canteloupe, watermelon, severe OAS to others, insect bites (severe to horseflies), various drugs, way too many environmental allergens, and asthma.

Offline Ciel

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Re: Medical ID with QR Code?
« Reply #6 on: January 10, 2018, 05:57:16 PM »
Thanks Janelle. I like the MyID bracelet (aesthetics) but the cost is crazy and I am not willing to pay nearly $100 for a silicone bracelet when I already have a perfectly good metal MedicAlert brand bracelet.

I still like the idea of the portable health record stored in the cloud. I found another company that is based in Canada (2beID), which is much more affordable for me. But they arenít as nice looking and the services are not 100% identical. I might try that one sometime, maybe. If my phone got lost or damaged in an accident the cloud based info would still be accessible without being tied to my phone.

Is there an app that you use to store your med records?

Online Janelle205

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Re: Medical ID with QR Code?
« Reply #7 on: January 10, 2018, 08:22:57 PM »
I use Google docs and then have the app for that on my phone - it is always signed in so that someone could get it without me putting in a password.

You can access docs from anywhere, you would just have to sign in.
Allergic to soy, egg, tomato, apple, cherry, peach, pear, nectarine, canteloupe, watermelon, severe OAS to others, insect bites (severe to horseflies), various drugs, way too many environmental allergens, and asthma.

Online rebekahc

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Re: Medical ID with QR Code?
« Reply #8 on: January 11, 2018, 09:52:20 AM »
Hi Ciel,

I know this isn't exactly what you have in mind, but it is cost effective and allows you to have more medical info available than a standard bracelet while keeping it private as well.  We had one of these for DS when he was younger and began reacting to the metal in his medical alert bracelet.

It seems like this design would allow for you to insert your own link or qr code that would go to your online records if you wanted.

http://www.idonme.com/index.php
TX - USA
DS - peanut, tree nut, milk, eggs, corn, soy, several meds, many environmentals. Finally back on Xolair!
DD - mystery anaphylaxis, shellfish.
DH - banana/avocado, aspirin.  Asthma.
Me - peanut, tree nut, shellfish, banana/avocado/latex,  some meds.

Online spacecanada

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Re: Medical ID with QR Code?
« Reply #9 on: January 11, 2018, 11:13:12 AM »
If you have an Apple device, everything stored on your iCloud account is accessible via the iCloud website with your Apple ID. I would just use that, or any other cloud storage already linked to your phone or computer, like Google docs as someone previously mentioned.

My Mum also keeps a hard copy of her major records in some sort of medically indicated pouch on her fridge, so paramedics can grab it on the go.
anaphylaxis to tree nuts, peanuts, potato, and wheat