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List of soy ingredients
Former admin
Past Administrator
(no longer active)

Posted: Sep 18th, 2007 at 07:19 pm

This list may not be comprehensive - please post additions below.

NOTE: soybean oil and soy lecithin are OK for many soy-allergic individuals. Check with your doctor if you are uncertain about these.

edamame (soybeans)
flavoring (including natural and artificial)*
high protein flour (possibly)*
hydrolyzed plant, soy or vegetable protein*
miso
shoyu sauce
soy (albumin, flour, grits, nuts, milk, protein or protein isolate, sprouts)
soya
soya flour
soybean
soy sauce
Tamari
Tempeh
Teriyaki sauce
textured vegetable protein (TVP)
tofu
many vegetable broths*

*Check with manufacturer before using

NOTE: soy protein isolate is currently an ingredient in Benadryl Children’s FastMelt Tabs


« Last Edited by booandbrimom Sep 23rd, 2007 at 03:11 pm »

Posted: Sep 21st, 2007 at 11:20 pm

for those sensitive to oils too:

Vitamin E may be derived from soy.

And recently I read a label that said contains live active cultures (soy based) and stated "contains no milk"

So live active cultures can be grown on soy? But not all labels tell you if it has been grown on soy or milk etc.

I need to make a list of dd FA for the school cook, the most difficult is soy because there are so many aliases. Smiley

Wnt2BSoyFree
Member


Posted: Sep 22nd, 2007 at 01:12 am

Vitamin E may also be listed as:

tocopheryl
tocopherol


It may also have any number of prefixes, (dl- , alpha-, gamma- , etc.) and can be followed by other words like acetate.

Other possible soy derived ingredients include:

Sterol
Stanol
Phytosterol
Plant esters
Isoflavens
MSG


I have also recently found that the following ingredients are soy derived:

Glycine Soja steol (found in Vaseline Intensive Rescue Hand Cream)
Natto Gum


« Last Edited by Wnt2BSoyFree Sep 22nd, 2007 at 10:29 am »

Allergies: Who the heck knows any more Smiley

"Some people take Zoloft, Paxil, or Welbutrin to feel normal - I take Claritin, Singulair, Benadryl, & EpiPens." ~Wnt2BSoyFree

USA
TabiCat
Moderator


Posted: Sep 22nd, 2007 at 01:27 am

Smiley MSG OH that could explain a lot. I never even thought about that possibility.

Wnt2BSoyFree
Member


Posted: Sep 22nd, 2007 at 08:54 am

MSG is one that many people do not realize can be soy-based. Before I learned I this, I thought that my reactions to Chick-Fil-A were due to the peanut oil they fry in. Now I know it was all about the MSG in their recipe.

Edit is in bold ~ nice to know I can go back and correct my boo-boos Smiley

« Last Edited by Wnt2BSoyFree Sep 22nd, 2007 at 09:43 am »

Allergies: Who the heck knows any more Smiley

"Some people take Zoloft, Paxil, or Welbutrin to feel normal - I take Claritin, Singulair, Benadryl, & EpiPens." ~Wnt2BSoyFree

USA
Posted: Sep 22nd, 2007 at 10:04 am

Yes, MSG and tocopherol. Added to list, almost forgot those

Natto Gum too, didn't know that


Xanthan Gum

may be grown and derived from soy or some other plant material
but most of the time it's corn

some manufacturers claiming no corn still use it, I wonder

Posted: Sep 22nd, 2007 at 10:06 am

Margarine and some Mayonnaise
made from soybean oil

« Last Edited by Sep 22nd, 2007 at 10:55 am »

Wnt2BSoyFree
Member


Posted: Sep 22nd, 2007 at 10:25 am

Oh!! Here's another:

Corn

Yes, corn - it (or other vegetables, for that matter) can be genetically altered with soy. I learned this by reading a cereal box that said "Our corn contains traces of soy"
Smiley Smiley Smiley


Two more to add to the list:

Lecithin (can be produced with soy, peanut, etc.)
Natural Flavors

« Last Edited by Wnt2BSoyFree Sep 22nd, 2007 at 10:28 am »

Allergies: Who the heck knows any more Smiley

"Some people take Zoloft, Paxil, or Welbutrin to feel normal - I take Claritin, Singulair, Benadryl, & EpiPens." ~Wnt2BSoyFree

USA
Posted: Sep 22nd, 2007 at 10:44 am

Nothing makes me hate America more than

[b]SOY[/B]

This list makes me want to run in the other
direction I can just imagine how the school cook
is going to feel when I hand it in

Posted: Sep 22nd, 2007 at 10:57 am

vegetable oil

I always ask in restaurants "what vegetable" 9 times out of 10 its either soy
or a blend containing soy

Also in pizzerias, if you ask what kind of oil, they'll say olive
but when ask for specifics some say a blend "part olive/part soy"

Wnt2BSoyFree
Member


Posted: Sep 22nd, 2007 at 12:10 pm

Another thing to keep in mind is that, not all of these ingredients will always be made with soy. However, ones produced with soy may not always be labeled as such - as the FDA has the following silly rules:

Quote:
Section 403(i) of the Act, 21 U.S.C. 343(i), requires that a food label bear the common or usual name of the food and, where fabricated from two or more ingredients, the common or usual name of each ingredient of the food, except that spices, flavorings, and certain colors are not required to be individually declared.


Quote:
The definition of "major food allergen" excludes any highly refined oil derived from one of the eight foods or food groups, and any ingredient derived from such an oil, as well as any ingredient exempt under the petition process specified in section 403(w)(6), 21 U.S.C. 343(w)(6), or the notification process specified in section 403(w)(7), 21 U.S.C. 343(w)(7).(4)

Allergies: Who the heck knows any more Smiley

"Some people take Zoloft, Paxil, or Welbutrin to feel normal - I take Claritin, Singulair, Benadryl, & EpiPens." ~Wnt2BSoyFree

USA
Posted: Sep 22nd, 2007 at 12:27 pm

Good important points Wnt2bsoyfree, I'll add that disclaimer to my list for the school.

giester2
New Member


Posted: Oct 3rd, 2007 at 11:42 am

Okay now this is going to seem very strange but here we go.

I was diagnosed by a dr with an allergy to Soy. When I was diagnosed it was more of a gastric problem than anything else. As I got older this turned into an Anaphylactic Reaction (I have had 2 Ana's to soy)

I can eat Kikomans Soy Sauce.

Don't understand it but I can. Absolutely no reactions.

I have been told that it is because it is a brew (like tea) and not actually soy.

I still don't understand that because I am positive I would react to a liquid that was brewed with nuts, since I can touch a nut and swell up.

Any comments or suggestions?


ANA to Peanuts, Tree Nuts, and Soy.
Also allergic to Wheat, Rice, Melons, Raw Vegetables, Coconut, Animal Dander, Animal Saliva, Mold, Pollen, Ozone, Dust...etc.
giester2
New Member


Posted: Oct 3rd, 2007 at 11:49 am

Sep 22nd, 2007 at 10:57 am, wrote:
vegetable oil

I always ask in restaurants "what vegetable" 9 times out of 10 its either soy
or a blend containing soy

Also in pizzerias, if you ask what kind of oil, they'll say olive
but when ask for specifics some say a blend "part olive/part soy"


Be careful with this. A very good friend owns a BBQ Restaurant and I quized him about his fry oil. Both he and his manager say that sometimes they don't know until the cube of lard shows up what type they are getting. They have a standard price they pay for the lard. The supplier then makes the decision on what blend they send according to market prices so that they gain the most profit.

SO if they don't know until the lard shows up, the fry boy just knows its grease and probably doesn't even know to inquire about what type it is this week.

This is why you see on ingredient listings "vegetable and/or soy bean oil"

ANA to Peanuts, Tree Nuts, and Soy.
Also allergic to Wheat, Rice, Melons, Raw Vegetables, Coconut, Animal Dander, Animal Saliva, Mold, Pollen, Ozone, Dust...etc.
Posted: Oct 3rd, 2007 at 04:01 pm

Oct 3rd, 2007 at 11:42 am, giester2 wrote:
Okay now this is going to seem very strange but here we go.

I was diagnosed by a dr with an allergy to Soy. When I was diagnosed it was more of a gastric problem than anything else. As I got older this turned into an Anaphylactic Reaction (I have had 2 Ana's to soy)

I can eat Kikomans Soy Sauce.

Don't understand it but I can. Absolutely no reactions.

I have been told that it is because it is a brew (like tea) and not actually soy.

I still don't understand that because I am positive I would react to a liquid that was brewed with nuts, since I can touch a nut and swell up.

Any comments or suggestions?





Maybe because soy sauce is fermented too, right? That must change it somehow.