login
Food Allergy Support is now on Twitter. Follow us @FASupport. You may also follow our Tweets in our new global footer at the bottom of the page here at FAS!

FAS has upgraded our forum security. Some members may need to log in again. If you are unable to remember your login information, please email food.allergy.supt@flash.net and we will help you get back in. Thanks for your patience!

Author Topic: Risk Literacy  (Read 866 times)

Description:

Offline LinksEtc

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2,746
Risk Literacy
« on: April 22, 2016, 08:50:14 AM »
Episode #9 - The Shark and the Killer Snail
https://soundcloud.com/stat-signal-podcast/episode-9-the-shark-and-the-killer-snail?utm_content=buffercfa54&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer


Quote
How do our perceptions of risk, and our outsized — or undersized — fears affect our health? In this episode of Signal we explore the killer snail (flu) and the shark (cancer screening) of medicine.

(It's a metaphor, people.)

The Signal podcast is produced by Katie Hiler. Illustration by Molly Ferguson for STAT.


-----------------------------------



"One surgeon says you need an operation. Another says you don't. Here's why that happens."
http://www.vox.com/2016/5/19/11691622/surgery-second-opinion-research-jama

Quote
If Copeland had gone with that first doctor's advice, he said, "I would be dead right now or permanently disabled. It’s not even a question."

Quote
A new study, published in the Annals of Surgery, tried to get to the bottom of that question. The authors found it all seems to come down to how different surgeons perceive risk — a reminder of how terrible humans are at risk perception, even highly skilled surgeons.






« Last Edit: May 20, 2016, 08:55:57 AM by LinksEtc »

Offline LinksEtc

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2,746
Re: Risk Literacy
« Reply #1 on: April 22, 2016, 08:55:07 AM »
A few links ...


Re: Bias


Re: Docs helping patients to surf the internet


Re: Docs helping patients to surf the internet
(The dropeik posts)


Re: FDA


---------


"Why aren’t we afraid of asthma?"
https://asthmaeducationallergies.wordpress.com/2016/01/27/why-arent-we-afraid-of-asthma/

Quote
I have been following the buzz in the food allergy online support groups for a while now. It seems many of the parents in these groups live in fear of an allergen being encountered casually and thus causing anaphylaxis and death.  Yet many don’t think of the more common killer. Asthma.



General asthma info & links


---------


Let's talk about anxiety


GMO




« Last Edit: May 07, 2016, 10:57:45 AM by LinksEtc »

Offline LinksEtc

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2,746
Re: Risk Literacy
« Reply #2 on: April 22, 2016, 09:58:39 AM »
Nice post.

"Managing the risk of food allergy"
http://susannahfox.com/2016/07/31/managing-the-risk-of-food-allergy/

Quote
When our son was diagnosed with food allergies, we were absorbed into a new way of life, learning the folkways of keeping him safe.

Quote
Actually, we are all managing risk. And there is a lot written about risk.


--------------------------------------


Tweeted by @deborahblum

Know This First: Risk Perception Is Always Irrational.
We need a post-Enlightenment definition of "rationality." Reason can take us only so far.
04.11.2016 / BY David Ropeik

http://undark.org/article/know-this-first-risk-perception-is-always-irrational/

Quote
It’s hard not to call them ignorant, selfish, and irrational, or to label such behavior, as some do — often with more than a hint of derision — “science denialism.”

Quote
This arrogance is particularly common in the scientific, engineering, and academic communities — cultures that rest on the bedrock Enlightenment belief in reason and logic. This is curious — and an interesting example of science denialism in itself — because the scientific evidence, supported by countless examples from the real world, makes it inescapably clear that we are not the perfectly rational creatures we like to think we are.








« Last Edit: August 02, 2016, 10:49:17 AM by LinksEtc »