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Author Topic: Michelle Bray, 21, collapses and dies after snack (11/15/07)  (Read 1909 times)

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a member (account deleted) posted on 11/15/07 at 06:59 am:

Quote
http://www.news.com.au/heraldsun/story/0,21985,22758673-24331,00.html

November 15, 2007 12:00am
MICHELLE Bray's friends and workmates knew her as a quiet, happy, health-conscious person who was training to be a fitness instructor.

What they did not know about the Brisbane waitress was her severe allergy to seafood.

Given that Michelle, 21, did not own an EpiPen -- considered a must for people with severe food allergies -- it is likely she did not know the extent of her allergy herself.

However on Monday night at her workplace Christmas party, Michelle suffered a severe anaphylactic reaction to a dim sim and collapsed while playing table tennis with her best friend.

An ambulance was called and during the nine minutes it took to arrive, workmates including a bartender training as a paramedic, administered CPR.

Paramedics took over but by the time Michelle was in the ambulance she was unconscious and without a pulse.

Further attempts to resuscitate her were made when she reached Redlands Hospital, but to no avail.

President of Anaphylaxis Australia Maria Said said the tragic case suggested Michelle had not been properly diagnosed.

"Dim sims are considered a high-risk food for sufferers of seafood allergies," she said.

"There are lots of adults out in the community who know they're allergic to food but haven't had access to proper diagnosis and treatment."

About one in 100 Australian adults are allergic to certain foods, and up to one in 25 children.