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Author Topic: New to this, lots of questions  (Read 4382 times)

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Offline CMdeux

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Re: New to this, lots of questions
« Reply #15 on: March 08, 2013, 11:32:28 AM »
We find Sixlets at our local Michael's store.   I very definitely prefer them to M&M's, which I've never especially cared for.
Resistance isn't futile.  It's voltage divided by current. 

Western U.S.

Offline Jessica

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Re: New to this, lots of questions
« Reply #16 on: March 08, 2013, 12:44:51 PM »
Around Valentine's day we found Hershey-ets where were labeled as safe. Too bad they're only seasonal but maybe they'll have some at Easter too.

another option is Smarties from Canada. We buy them from http://www.peanutfreeplanet.com
USA
DD18-PA/TNA
DD16 and DS14-NKA

Offline EmilyAnn

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Re: New to this, lots of questions
« Reply #17 on: March 08, 2013, 01:30:08 PM »
he has had sixlets before. He likes them, but since they are shaped different than M&Ms they are not an acceptable substitute (for him, he's 4 and kind of funny about stuff like that) LOL

I bought 2 bags of skippers so those should last him a while. And it is good to know there are other kinds of chocolate I can find in the local stores.

Is there a certain brand of chocolate chips that are safe? He loves chocolate chips in cookies, pancakes, and muffins
Mommy to David age 5 1/2 allergic to cats, dogs, pollen, dust, mold, peanuts, tree nuts, beans, and peas and suffering from severe eczema and 3 other little boys with no know allergies

Offline Macabre

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Re: New to this, lots of questions
« Reply #18 on: March 08, 2013, 02:08:56 PM »
I'm going to quote from what I just typed in your other thread. :)


Some things you should know about labeling: it's not as helpful as it needs to be.  Companies only have to label for the top 8 allergens if they are actual ingredients. However, some children have reactions to trace amounts that can remain on equipment--even if the manufacturer says they clean well.  Manufacturers are not required by law to label for shared lines--just actual ingredients.  Some companies label "may contain."  Just believe them. Some of that labeling is CYA, but at this point, just believe them if it says may contain.

However, know that just because a label doesn't say it contains the allergen doesn't necessarily mean that it 100% doesn't. 

Some companies are known for labeling for shared lines:  General Mills, Keebler (Keebler may be a GM brand), Pillsbury, Hershey.

What our allergist told us:
No Asian food unless you make it yourself (most all restaurants don't fully clean the woks, and the cashew or peanut or sesame or shellfish protein remainPF Chang, and they are good abotu serving folks with food allergies--but at this point, I'd just stay away from all Asian restauratns)

No ice cream parlors

No chocolate unless you know it's safe
 
No bakery items

Carry the epi everywhere (at least two). Make sure you don't let it be exposed to extreme cold or heat. 


Me: Sesame, shellfish, chamomile, sage
DS: Peanuts

Offline Macabre

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Re: New to this, lots of questions
« Reply #19 on: March 08, 2013, 02:20:51 PM »
Okay, yeah, I definitely would ask for a blood test right away. Being on this learning curve is tough enough without having to avoid foods unnecessarily.

But--I would want to clear foods that he doesn't seem negative to in the bloodwork in a doctor's office--called an In-office Food Challenge.  And really--if your allergist has been that (un)helpful, I might consider a different one if after working with this one a bit more you're not satisfied. 
Me: Sesame, shellfish, chamomile, sage
DS: Peanuts

Offline Ra3chel

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Re: New to this, lots of questions
« Reply #20 on: April 01, 2013, 06:56:59 PM »

Also, it took me a while, but I learned to trust my son's instincts when food causes a reaction even if mild.  He whole heartedly claimed he didn't like nuts (diagnosed at 4 with TNA), but I had never given them to him because they were a choking hazard.  A couple years after his diagnosis, I made meringue cookies.  After he said his throat was scratchy and sure enough on his next skin test, egg was positive...he had never been tested for egg, because again, he didn't like them so didn't eat them as plain egg.


YEP. This was me, to a T. I was a picky kid, but the aversion to foods I was allergic to was *different*. I noticed the same arc when I began to develop new allergies as an adult.

If your son's a picky eater in general, it might help to ask him *why* he dislikes specific foods when it comes up--things like "it makes my tongue feel weird" are decent, if far from universal, tells. My parents assumed I was just being dramatic when I told them I wouldn't eat PB because "It sticks in my throat and makes my ears funny." Spoiler: Yeah, not so much.
The 3 is silent.

Offline hezzier

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Re: New to this, lots of questions
« Reply #21 on: April 01, 2013, 08:52:11 PM »
I just thought of something else.  My DH travels frequently so we have a rule that when he is out of town...there are NO new foods for dinner. 
DS (13 yrs) TN
DD (16 yrs) cat, wasps and yellow jackets

NH, USA