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Discussion Boards => Teens and Food Allergies => Topic started by: Jim Sweet on August 08, 2013, 06:32:33 PM

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Title: App for Parents of Kids with Severe Allergies
Post by: Jim Sweet on August 08, 2013, 06:32:33 PM
I'm working on an app for parents of kids with severe allergies and I was hoping I could get some thoughts on the concept.

In an emergency the app lets people alert nearby off-duty EMTs, medical personnel, and other responders who can quickly provide aid.  In addition, this builds a network of people with EpiPens who can be alerted if someone nearby is going into anaphylactic shock. 

I would love to hear your thoughts whenever you have a free moment.

Thanks in advanced everyone!
-Jim
Title: Re: App for Parents of Kids with Severe Allergies
Post by: twinturbo on August 09, 2013, 01:10:08 PM
How would it work? Even on duty not all EMTs in all municipalities, counties or states are allowed to administer pediatric doses epinephrine. A lot of the trucks carry diphenhydramine IV-only often preferring to wait until a higher threshold or grade of anaphylaxis before administering epinephrine. Heck, a lot of full on critical care doctors wouldn't administer it as a frontline therapy despite NIAID's recommendation.

Municipal police, county, state police or highway patrol? As a general rule they'd have no clue although they could keep their cool and maybe call in with good accuracy. As difficult as it is dealing with school districts sometimes in this regard they're ahead of a lot of first responders.

Now if you could work with MedicAlert and take advantage of their newly released GPS product to autodial emergency dispatch or MedicAlert makes the call for you if you hit the red button on the app you may have a winner.
Title: Re: App for Parents of Kids with Severe Allergies
Post by: rebekahc on August 09, 2013, 04:44:57 PM
I'm working on an app for parents of kids with severe allergies and I was hoping I could get some thoughts on the concept.

In an emergency the app lets people alert nearby off-duty EMTs, medical personnel, and other responders who can quickly provide aid.  In addition, this builds a network of people with EpiPens who can be alerted if someone nearby is going into anaphylactic shock. 

I would love to hear your thoughts whenever you have a free moment.

Thanks in advanced everyone!
-Jim

People with allergies shouldn't need a network of people with EpiPens, they should have their own.  Plus, why would an off duty EMT/medical personnel/responders carry EpiPens?  And how would I know they had stored them properly?  The allergic (or a caregiver for the very young) should be able to administer epi to themselves - that's kind of the point of an autoinjector.  If they were incapacitated such that they couldn't use the pen, how would they use the app?
Title: Re: App for Parents of Kids with Severe Allergies
Post by: Jim on August 12, 2013, 01:58:17 PM
Thanks for awesome replies rebekahc and twinturbo!!  Your feedback really helps a lot!

Also sorry for the slow response, I thought that I would be emailed if I got a reply.  I'll check these threads more frequently from now on.

twinturbo
You are 100% right that not all states allow EMTs to administer epinephrine but new legislation in a few states is allowing for any trained person to administer epinephrine.  I'm talking with a few dispatch centers to see if their people would be interested and it is definitely been a mixed response.  2 counties seem interested though so I figure that's a good start.  I'd love to get more questions, suggestions, or concerns from you if you can think of any?  Thanks for letting me know that NIAID recommends using epinephrine as a frontline therapy and how doctors don't like to use it as such.  I didn't know that but that is useful information.  I looked into MedicAlert's gps but I don't think I understand how you were suggesting to work with them.  Any chance you could elaborate on when/how a person would auto-dial 911?  Thanks again!



rebekahc
People should always carry their own epiPens with them but from what I understand there are a fair number of people who frequently forget them and a large number of people who were never prescribed one.  I know not all EMTs carry epiPens (especially while off-duty) but a lot of them (especially in rural areas) carry what they call squirrel bags which contain some basic medical tools, including epinephrine.  I can't think of anyway to verify that a responder's epiPen has been stored properly but I can do a lot to vet the quality of the responders.  If the person was incapacitated and the app gets used I anticipated that it was used by a bystander who may not know how to use an epiPen or does not have one on them.  Does that answer your questions?  I'd love to hear anymore questions, suggestions, or concerns you come up with if you can think of any?  Thanks again!

Title: Re: App for Parents of Kids with Severe Allergies
Post by: twinturbo on August 12, 2013, 02:10:37 PM
Two things. First is I do know a former combat medic now a civilian full paramedic who owes me a 'solid'. I plan to cash that in for my own purposes at a later date but for the sake of argument how are you engaging EMS personnel? I had to play an insider card and do a solid for him first.

Second what's your plan? Have you ever brought a product or service to market before? With all due respect I'm not seeing a disciplined approach to product development and market research.

Don't shoot the messenger! Remember you asked.  :) You have my moral support for what it's worth. I may even want to help despite doing R&D through the internets.
Title: Re: App for Parents of Kids with Severe Allergies
Post by: Jim on August 12, 2013, 03:03:53 PM
Hey twinturbo.  Thanks for all of your support, I really appreciate you taking the time to ask these questions  :)

I'm reaching out to local EMTs through meetup and other events and frequently by just walking up to local fire stations and saying hi.  There are also some local volunteer groups I'm reaching out to as well. 

You've got a sharp eye to see that I don't have a well defined game plan since I'm learning by doing but I would to love to hear any pro-tips you could share?  I don't like to abuse people's good nature but if you want to help with the R&D research I would love to accept your help   :) 
Title: Re: App for Parents of Kids with Severe Allergies
Post by: twinturbo on August 12, 2013, 03:18:42 PM
Don't get your hopes up I myself am useless but I know some people who know some people who are.

I still have no idea what your product/service is. What does the app do? How does someone use it? Where does it fit in emergency management? Does it duplicate what an Auvi-q already does with its voice prompt? Do you know if you need FDA approval at any point? Are you registered as a developer? Do you know what's both required of you as a developer and how that registration might allow you access to a target market, and also to test your app in a device simulator or actual device?

Have you ever anaphylaxed yourself? Do you have any EMS background? Usually dispatch is closed off to anyone they haven't performed at least a preliminary background check on. So color me a little surprised they talked to you at all. I'm also not sure where dispatch comes into it knowing fairly well how at least one operates and EMS on duty can stop and assist but can't necessarily assign themselves to run a patient themselves at will without communicating with dispatch.

What does the app do that MedicAlert, a household name service, does not already do with ID?
Title: Re: App for Parents of Kids with Severe Allergies
Post by: Jim on August 12, 2013, 03:30:28 PM
Sorry of I didn't explain the app well, can you tell me which part of my previous explanation doesn't make sense?

In an emergency the app lets people alert nearby off-duty EMTs, medical personnel, and other responders who can quickly provide aid.  In addition, this builds a network of people with EpiPens who can be alerted if someone nearby is going into anaphylactic shock. 

I don't have a EMS background but I've been doing a lot of personal research for a while.
Title: Re: App for Parents of Kids with Severe Allergies
Post by: rebekahc on August 12, 2013, 03:38:12 PM
Quote
rebekahc
People should always carry their own epiPens with them but from what I understand there are a fair number of people who frequently forget them and a large number of people who were never prescribed one.  I know not all EMTs carry epiPens (especially while off-duty) but a lot of them (especially in rural areas) carry what they call squirrel bags which contain some basic medical tools, including epinephrine.  I can't think of anyway to verify that a responder's epiPen has been stored properly but I can do a lot to vet the quality of the responders.  If the person was incapacitated and the app gets used I anticipated that it was used by a bystander who may not know how to use an epiPen or does not have one on them.  Does that answer your questions?  I'd love to hear anymore questions, suggestions, or concerns you come up with if you can think of any?  Thanks again!

1.  If I was never prescribed an EpiPen or thought it was unimportant enough that I didn't carry it, why would have this app?

2.  If these squirrel bags are left in their vehicle, then the heat would destroy the epi rendering it useless.

3.  If an allergic person is incapacitated, why would a bystander look through that person's phone for an app?  How would a bystander know (or be qualified) to diagnose anaphylaxis?  They should call 911.  If there are EpiPens available, they are almost self-explanatory and surely a bystander who took the time to search a person's phone for an app could read the directions.
Title: Re: App for Parents of Kids with Severe Allergies
Post by: twinturbo on August 12, 2013, 03:42:30 PM
Jim, how does it alert off duty EMS personnel? Does it ping their phones like a bat signal from the sender's phone? Does it act locally on only that phone in a prerecorded voice that plays in a loop?

Here's how a tactical team forms in counties that do not have their own dedicated team. A rotation are on call, I think during their off duty times so it may be staggered, but they carry dedicated devices that are only when they are called in for that single purpose. Dispatch puts the call out to them they respond.

I take it you also want to build a network of lay individuals volunteering to use their EAI (epinephrine autoinjector including Adrenaclick, Auvi-q and EpiPen brands) at the request of an unknown person to them. How do these individuals know the location of the person requesting assistance to bystanders? Furthermore, where does this belong in the process of epinephrine administration with an immediate call to rescue squad? 911 in USA.

What would be the radius of alert? 500 m? 5 km?

Have you thought about starting with your local small business association to get assistance in drawing up a business plan, and how to do your own market research or seek affordable professional market research?

At the very least you would need one incredibly butt-covering user agreement to limit your liability.
Title: Re: App for Parents of Kids with Severe Allergies
Post by: Jim on August 12, 2013, 08:43:28 PM
Hi twinturbo
The app alerts responders who also have the app on their phone.  I'm working with just smartphones at the moment but I am looking into ways to work with non-smart phones as well.  The radius may need to be dynamic in the future but for now I'm starting with .5 miles.  I'm currently being advised by my local SBDC so I'm starting to put together a business plan.  I still need to talk with lawyers about how to handle liability but you're very right about needing to pay very close attention to that.


Hey rebekahc
Most deaths from anaphylaxis (at least according to my research) seem to be from people who were never prescribed an epiPen or who didn't have theirs on them at the time.  It feels like a pretty good just-in-case tool to me but of course if people don't want to use it than it doesn't do much good.  I'm actually not sure about how the squirrel bags are stored but that is a great point about the heat from the car. I'll ask some of the EMTs how they store their bags.  I don't anticipate a bystander to launch the app from someone else's phone, my aim is for the bystander to have it on their own phone to look out for their freinds and family who have allergies.  Thanks for taking the time to reply to me, those were some great questions!  Did what I say make sense?  I'd love to keep this conversation going if you have any more thoughts?

Thanks again to both of you guys!!
-Jim
Title: Re: App for Parents of Kids with Severe Allergies
Post by: SilverLining on August 13, 2013, 08:57:43 AM
I agree with rebekahc.  If a person doesn't have a prescription, or doesn't other carrying it, I doubt they would bother downloading an app instead.  And a concern to me, would this add to the people who should carry an epi but don't bother.  Instead of just thinking I won't need an epi today they will now think I won't need an epi today, but if I do, I'll find someone who has one.

~~~~

One of my son's is a paramedic, and actually does have his own medical supplies including epi.  But I doubt he would want to be on-call 24/7 for people to dumb to carry their own and not willing to all 9-1-1.

And anyway....when you use epi you are always supposed to go the hospital.
Title: Re: App for Parents of Kids with Severe Allergies
Post by: CMdeux on August 13, 2013, 09:08:19 AM
What rebekah and Silver said.

 :yes:

The people who die from food allergies tend to know that they are allergic-- but to not know how allergic, if you will.  They don't really have a good handle on why they should carry epinephrine, so they don't.  They would NOT download an app about it, either-- because they seriously do not understand that they are at real risk.

Title: Re: App for Parents of Kids with Severe Allergies
Post by: Jim Sweet on August 13, 2013, 10:02:01 AM
Thanks for the useful feedback SilverLining and CMdeux

I had not considered that this app might cause people to neglect their responsibility to carry their own epi or would make them think that they don't need to go to the hospital.  If thats what people end up thinking then the app is completely counter-productive and beyond useless.  I hadn't gotten that feedback till now but I'm going to look into this a lot more.

It sounds to me like no one who has replied would be interested in using this app to receive help.  Does that mean no one would be interested in using the app to help someone else?  Even a quick "yes" or "no" would be really useful to me  :)

Also SilverLining, any chance you know how your son stores his medical supplies so that the epinephrine doesn't go bad?  I am a big fan of your son's line of work and I think you made a great point about your son not wanting to be on call 24/7 365 days a year.  I should mention though that they people who download the app can choose when they are available to respond so that they don't have to always be on call.

I really appreciate you guys taking the time to reply to me and if you have anymore suggestions, concerns, or questions I would really love to hear them.  I can't tell you how useful this is to me  :D
Title: Re: App for Parents of Kids with Severe Allergies
Post by: rebekahc on August 13, 2013, 10:48:55 AM
Quote
Hey rebekahc
Most deaths from anaphylaxis (at least according to my research) seem to be from people who were never prescribed an epiPen or who didn't have theirs on them at the time.  It feels like a pretty good just-in-case tool to me but of course if people don't want to use it than it doesn't do much good.  I'm actually not sure about how the squirrel bags are stored but that is a great point about the heat from the car. I'll ask some of the EMTs how they store their bags. I don't anticipate a bystander to launch the app from someone else's phone, my aim is for the bystander to have it on their own phone to look out for their freinds and family who have allergies.  Thanks for taking the time to reply to me, those were some great questions!  Did what I say make sense?  I'd love to keep this conversation going if you have any more thoughts?

Again, not trying to beat a dead horse, but if someone thinks the allergy is serious enough for them to download an app to try to keep their friends and family safe, wouldn't they just carry the epi?  If they don't think the allergy is serious enough for epi, then they're not gonna think they need the app either. 
Title: Re: App for Parents of Kids with Severe Allergies
Post by: twinturbo on August 13, 2013, 12:46:47 PM
Jim, is your goal to develop products and/or services to market for parents of children who have life-threatening allergic reactions? or was the goal to develop an app, any app, the driving force with the customer profile variable?

This isn't a morals quiz I'm a huge supporter of innovation and the entrepreneurial spirit. A more efficient approach would be to build a profile of your customer and assess where the needs are not being met. The risk you would be taking on is huge and impractical. Neither is an unknown app from an unknown developer likely to make waves even if there is some benefit--cross promotion with a familiar, trusted name would be paramount.

Go with the momentum of your intended customer who must carry their own EAI at all times. Reinforce that protocol that is endorsed by any credible source. Trim back the lofty goals of an app to what would be common sense and efficient.

Have you thought of maybe an 'egg timer' alarm model where the user can preprogram an alarm at desired intervals that prompts the user to identify where his or her epinephrine is? The app's key feature could be that the prompt keeps coming up until the location (in pocket, in purse, in carrier) is inputted. That might be of assistance to anyone, particularly someone new to the idea of carrying epinephrine. If it's an app you're selling you would be wise to consider a portion of each sale go to FARE for cross promotion purposes.

But that's not the point. You need to understand your customer first and develop to their needs. What that may be through an app is what you should discover. For example, I make great use of ER finder. It lets me know what medical centers are near to me at any location. That is the sort of profile you'd need to build by someone who knows how to construct good surveys or people who have the time and skills to build netnographical profiles of posters, a few Q&A is fine but it's not going to give you what you need for solid development.
Title: Re: App for Parents of Kids with Severe Allergies
Post by: PurpleCat on August 13, 2013, 04:58:09 PM
I'm working on an app for parents of kids with severe allergies and I was hoping I could get some thoughts on the concept.

In an emergency the app lets people alert nearby off-duty EMTs, medical personnel, and other responders who can quickly provide aid.  In addition, this builds a network of people with EpiPens who can be alerted if someone nearby is going into anaphylactic shock. 

I would love to hear your thoughts whenever you have a free moment.

Thanks in advanced everyone!
-Jim

Just my point of view:

As a parent of a child with allergies, I would not use an app during anaphylaxis.  My child and I both carry epinephrine injectors.  There is no time to think or to wait for anyone else to take over.  Epinephrine and call 911 immediately is what it takes to save a life.  An app would be just another step and delay.  Why would it be better than calling 911?

Now, having given my child epinephrine and gone in the ambulance to the hospital this Spring, I thought where and how in that process would an app help me as a parent.  An app that would provide the personal data about my child's medical history, allergies, etc..... would have saved me from answering endless and repetitive questions both in the ambulance and in the ER when clearly my focus needed to be on my child and what was happening.  I missed a few details and had to catch up later because I was so frazzled and scared.  That kind of app would have been helpful.
Title: Re: App for Parents of Kids with Severe Allergies
Post by: SilverLining on August 13, 2013, 05:18:31 PM
Hi Jim, I'm not sure how/where he stores his medical supplies.  He works for a private company, usually at concerts, amusement parks, etc.  he doesn't respond to 9-1-1 calls (thought he's qualified for that job) and he doesn't always have an ambulance.
Title: Re: App for Parents of Kids with Severe Allergies
Post by: GoingNuts on August 14, 2013, 06:06:22 AM
I'm thinking something like this might have broader use, kind of like a "LifeAlert" pendant for senior citizens.  Push one button, multiple alerts are sent out - police, ambulance, MD's who are listed as contacts, and ICE contacts.

Am I reading you correctly?
Title: Re: App for Parents of Kids with Severe Allergies
Post by: Macabre on August 14, 2013, 11:48:14 AM
I hate to bring this up. It sounds so callous. And who knows what any of us would really do if we saw someone having anaphylaxis in a restaurant.  But unless there are Good Samaritan laws in our state (or country--many here live in Canada--we could be liable for administering an Epi or even handing our Epi to someone else.

Will this app be free?  How are recouping your costs for R&D?

And do you have a food allergy?

Most of the businesses I patronize that help our community started their business because they are dealing with a LTFA.

I am quite  technologically advanced, compared to the general population (work in html almost daily, tweak the CSS of my org's website, etc.).  I have had a smart phone since 2007 and use my current one almost to the exclusion of my laptop. I do use apps that I find helpful.

But I have not downloaded any food allergy-related apps (with the exception of a game so I could review it here). I don't know why. I've seen them. I guess I don't know that any I've seen would change things for me. I am probably not representative of your target market though. 

Also--the way an epipen is stored is a huge consideration for this app. There is such a small temp window. It's not just heat but cold.

Also--different EMTs handle reactions differently (as so ERs). I had anaphylaxis in December. The ER made that diagnosis. The EMT did not. The director said I did not have hives and did not have trouble breathing.  Well symptoms differ. But the fact is I did have symptoms that disappeared after injected myself with Epinephrine. And some came back after I was at the ER (biphasic).

But my insurance wasn't going to pay the ambulance company because the EMTs said I did not have anaphylaxis.

I'll link to a study showing that EMTs often do not recognize anaphylaxis. 

I think you are trying to do a nice thing. It might be a helpful thing. I would not use it personally. I would administer Epi, lie down with my feet above my heart, and call 911.  Period. But that's me.
Title: Re: App for Parents of Kids with Severe Allergies
Post by: Sneaker on August 18, 2013, 12:16:33 AM
I am not sure how this app could or would work but in the early stages it seems very interesting.

But I also would like to comment about some posts stating that anyone who is serious about their food allergies, self-carries and even knows how to self-administer their Epipen.  There are people, like my teen, who are serious about their food allergies, that have delays, special needs or other issues that prevent them from self-carrying and self-administering.  They watch what they eat, but can not handle carrying their own meds.
Title: Re: App for Parents of Kids with Severe Allergies
Post by: hedgehog on August 18, 2013, 07:46:34 AM
Also, teens are less likely to carry their epi than other age groups.  I would think that applies to teens who "know better."  Maybe teens whose parents think they carry their epi everywhere.  I would think maybe parents might want something as a back up, in case their kid does not have their epi when needed.
Title: Re: App for Parents of Kids with Severe Allergies
Post by: Macabre on August 18, 2013, 09:53:06 AM
Good points.  Teens may be more likely to use an app like this. 
Title: Re: App for Parents of Kids with Severe Allergies
Post by: Macabre on August 18, 2013, 09:58:17 AM
Ah--I found the study I was looking for. It's actually rather scary.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22712745


Anaphylaxis knowledge among paramedics: results of a national survey.

Jacobsen RC, Toy S, Bonham AJ, Salomone JA 3rd, Ruthstrom J, Gratton M.
Source
Department of Emergency Medicine, Truman Medical Center, University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine, Kansas City, Missouri 64108, USA. ryan.jacobsen@tmcmed.org
Abstract

BACKGROUND:
Very little is known about prehospital providers' knowledge regarding anaphylaxis care.

OBJECTIVES:
The purpose of this study was to evaluate how well nationally registered paramedics in the United States recognize classic and atypical presentations of anaphylaxis. We also assessed knowledge regarding treatment with epinephrine, including dosing, route of administration, and perceived contraindications to epinephrine use.

METHODS:
This was a blinded, cross-sectional online survey of a random sample of paramedics registered by the National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians that was distributed via e-mail. The survey contained two main sections: demographic data/self-assessment of confidence with anaphylaxis care and a cognitive assessment.

RESULTS:
A total of 3,537 paramedics completed the survey, for a 36.6% response rate. Among the respondents, 98.9% correctly recognized a case of classic anaphylaxis, whereas only 2.9% correctly identified the atypical presentation. Regarding treatment, 46.2% identified epinephrine as the initial drug of choice; 38.9% chose the intramuscular (IM) route of administration, and 60.5% identified the deltoid as the preferred location (11.6% thigh). Of the respondents, 98.0% were confident they could recognize anaphylaxis; 97.1% were confident they could manage anaphylaxis; 39.5% carry epinephrine autoinjectors (EAIs) on response vehicles; 95.4% were confident they could use an EAI; and 36.2% stated that there were contraindications to epinephrine administration in anaphylactic shock.

CONCLUSIONS:
Whereas a large percentage of the paramedics recognized classic anaphylaxis, a very small percentage recognized atypical anaphylaxis. Less than half chose epinephrine as the initial drug of choice, and most respondents were unable to identify the correct route/location of administration. This survey identifies a number of areas for improved education.

PMID: 22712745 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Title: Re: App for Parents of Kids with Severe Allergies
Post by: Macabre on August 18, 2013, 10:01:17 AM
It's the atypical presentations I worry about, as I see fewer and fewer typical symptoms as my son gets older (he's 15 now). Still, for typical presentations and for those who use an app like this, it could be helpful.  Clearly it's better to administer epinephrine sooner than later.  The question is condition of the auto-injector.  But in a life or death situation, I myself would try any epipen on hand, as long as the liquid didn't look yellow.  Also to consider: Good Sam laws, or lack thereof.
Title: Re: App for Parents of Kids with Severe Allergies
Post by: CMdeux on August 18, 2013, 10:12:00 AM
Right-- and while you'd HOPE that a bystander would, in fact, use their own personal autoinjectors in a life-or-death situation... the reality is that for some people, that is a matter of leaving themselves WITHOUT epinephrine.

For some people, the costs of replacement would be too high, and for others it would simply be a matter of taking the time to replace them, but either way, there is more at stake there than a Good Sam law can cover.

I'm still not entirely sure what this app would do that can't already happen under the right conditions-- and does, actually, happen (this is not the first time, either) probably more frequently than is reported. 

People WILL offer aid if they know what they are seeing and have a way to help without endangering themselves.



Title: Re: App for Parents of Kids with Severe Allergies
Post by: CMdeux on August 18, 2013, 10:19:59 AM
I am not sure how this app could or would work but in the early stages it seems very interesting.

But I also would like to comment about some posts stating that anyone who is serious about their food allergies, self-carries and even knows how to self-administer their Epipen.  There are people, like my teen, who are serious about their food allergies, that have delays, special needs or other issues that prevent them from self-carrying and self-administering.  They watch what they eat, but can not handle carrying their own meds.

I'm not sure that I completely understand this.

Is this someone who is mature enough to be independent?  Or not?

I realize that there is plenty of grey area there, but it seems REALLY foolish to allow independence that is-- please pardon my bluntness-- illusory.

I do understand the worry and the 'pull' to allow normalcy as much as seems reasonable/possible, and how one sometimes plays the odds there in order to allow one-time events that one judges to be moderate in risk.  But is this poster seriously suggesting that the kindness of strangers is the safety net for this child when s/he is away from home??  (I'm sincerely hoping NOT.)

If such a person lacks the maturity to self-carry, then I'm not clear how a smart phone app would really be very helpful either.

What am I missing? ???
Title: Re: App for Parents of Kids with Severe Allergies
Post by: twinturbo on August 18, 2013, 10:29:41 AM
Amongst the FAS population here we do have kids with developmental delays and LTFA. Like me. I still would not use the app as presented at any point. I do make routine use of ER finder apps, stopwatch timer apps (to track reaction times) and photo apps to record minor reactions so the allergist may make use of them later or for accommodation negotiations. That's my spoken piece on the subject.

I would love to see one developed for MedicAlert to have our info at the touch of a button in the ER if it has not already been done.
Title: Re: App for Parents of Kids with Severe Allergies
Post by: Macabre on August 18, 2013, 10:49:42 AM
So in a restaurant where someone with a diagnosed LTFA were having a reaction requiring epinephrine, if they requested an EpiPen, I would certainly give them mine.  My co-insurance is $54.  I wouldn't worry about it if a life is at stake.

Some folks here pay $300 for a set of EpiPens.  I still can't imagine that someone would value a human life less. 
Title: Re: App for Parents of Kids with Severe Allergies
Post by: CMdeux on August 18, 2013, 11:04:56 AM
I can't either-- but-- assume for a moment that you are on vacation and you have not got a reasonable means of replacing your OWN child's epinephrine...

I'd sure hesitate before burning through all of my family's supply, in light of my DD's reaction history.  I mean, I probably would do it anyway... but it would be UNBELIEVABLY stressful to us to be without epinephrine for her for any length of time-- even an hour or two.



Title: Re: App for Parents of Kids with Severe Allergies
Post by: Macabre on August 18, 2013, 11:34:24 AM
Well, recently I made a decision like that.

Admittedly, the connection may seem tenuous, but to me it has similarities. 

We were recently at Universal Studios.  Given our set of FAs, I assume we can eat at the park and only take a small purse that can go around my waste.  (Actually DS took a cinch sack and did take some Clementines, but the point is, we travel as light as possible when we go to amusement parks, and the cinch sack had to be put in a locker adjacent tothe ride anyway.)  My purse of course had two epis (and DS had two Auvis in his cinch sack--temps were fine for this--and an Epi in the bottom, buttoned pocket of his cargo shorts--an Epi works better in rides in that pocket than Auvis--they tended to fall out, even on rides that did not go upside down). 

I also had 6-8 WetOnes individual wipes. 

A father and son were in front of us, and the son--a teen older than DS--had a nosebleed. It was considerable.  The line was basically stopped while they did some maintenance on the ride. So we were going to be there a while.  Because people had to check bags into a locker before getting in line, no one had tissues with them.  I gave him one WetOne--then another.  His nose was bleeding a LOT.  But I did not give any more. He could have gone through all my WetOnes, and I was carrying them for DS' safety (he's developed hives at another amusement park from contact). 

I suggest that if they wanted to get tissues at the nearby restroom we'd hold their place in line.  They didn't want to.  They also didn't know I had more WetOnes, fyi. When it started bleeding again 10 minutes later, someone else asked me for a tissue, and I said I didn't have any. 

Really--it was early in the day, and I had to have a means of protecting DS.  And like I said--this kid could have easily gone through my entire supply and it wouldn't have helped him.

In the US, we are never without the ability to get extra Epis.  That is our particular situation.  Between my script and DS' script, we could always find a CVS or another drug store and get one.

I have no problem lending one Epi and calling 911.  Or two.  We travel with six.  And can get more.  If a person required all the epinephrine we had, that might be a different matter. 

But knowing I could help, I could not let someone suffer anaphylaxis and offer an epi on me, but that's just me. 
Title: Re: App for Parents of Kids with Severe Allergies
Post by: twinturbo on August 18, 2013, 11:41:00 AM
But would you use this as an app? Most of us would nail someone anaphylaxing w/in line of sight or come across but I wouldn't respond to some app putting out an APB. There's no way in hell I'm leading myself to an undisclosed location by an unknown party. On the other hand OP says it's for families to track one another and off duty EMS.
Title: Re: App for Parents of Kids with Severe Allergies
Post by: Macabre on August 18, 2013, 12:02:13 PM
No, I wouldn't use this app, but a teen might. 

Meh, I use FourSquare and don't mind someone else in the building seeing I'm there (they can't see who I fully am, btw).  But that aspect doesn't bother me at all. 

And I think that this is a better case than the worst case--death because there was no epinephrine around.  We read stories all the time about that being the case.  Based on my personal experience, I actually do not fully trust EMS.  But statistically speaking, at much of the time they know what they're doing.

Would I want my son to use this app?  If he were in the midst of dinner and realized he forgot his epis and realized he was having a reaction I'd want him to call 911.  But I would want him to use the epi before EMS got there. Because my goodness, they might make the mistake of not using epinephrine, and then what?  Also, we have been in a situation, a bad, bad bike accident when EMS did not arrive for 30 minutes and Kiddo was losing a lot of blood and most of his face was fractured. 30 minutes. With three calls to 911. 

No, my trust for EMS is NOT high (that and the fact they "dx" me as not having anaphylaxis in December when I had more than two body systems reacting after ingesting sesame AND the ER doc did say it was anaphylaxis (and I started feeling symptoms return in the ER and they gave a second dose of epi). 


So--if for any reason my DS forgot his epis (you may think that you will ensure this never happens because you are very careful, but wait until your kids get older--it can happen) and he was having a reaction, I'd sure rather him have someone's epi ASAP unless it had yellowed.  He absolutely needs to call 911, but I can't tell him to rely on them to be johnny on the spot or to do the right thing. 
Title: Re: App for Parents of Kids with Severe Allergies
Post by: Macabre on August 18, 2013, 12:05:01 PM
Everyone posting in and reading this thread should read this. 

https://www.facebook.com/groups/POKWASPeanutAllergy/permalink/10151589089902876/

The second response, from Angel Solgot--read her story.  It will give you chills.  EMS totally screwed up.
Title: Re: App for Parents of Kids with Severe Allergies
Post by: twinturbo on August 18, 2013, 12:13:18 PM
So Jim's app would have some merit and potential users.
Title: Re: App for Parents of Kids with Severe Allergies
Post by: Jim Sweet on August 20, 2013, 09:18:30 AM
Hey guys Iím sorry to have to apologize again for the slow response.  I was monitoring this thread every day but I didn't realize more people were posting until I saw a link to go to the 2nd page.  I've read through all the comments and I'm going to try to address them all now.  Thank you guys so much for your comments, suggestions, and questions.



Twinturbo:
The app started by wanting to help people (anyone) in emergency situations by connecting them to off-duty EMTs, medical personnal, and other responders.  I realized that trying to help everyone is a bit lofty, especially before launching, so I'm trying to focus in on the use cases that could give the most benefit.  Its good to know you use an ER finder app.  I was planning on implementing that kind of feature in my app but if people like you are already using it then maybe it's not necessary to duplicate it.  Also I think I really like that egg-timer idea.
   
PurpleCat
Thanks for your feedback and questions.  I agree that you and your child always carry injectors with you, I'm not trying to discourage anyone from doing that or from calling 911.  In the "work flow" of the app I envision people always calling 911 before using my app, however sometimes 911 canít help taking too long to get to the scene.  The point of the app is to connect with responders that are nearby who could quickly offer assistance.  Its great to hear more about how valuable medical history data is.  I was thinking of adding this feature into version 2 of the app but if you think it's critical then perhaps it should be a version 1 feature.

SilverLining
Thanks for getting back to me.  Do you by any chance know if the company stores his medical supplies and tells him what to pack or if he is in charge of that himself?

GoingNuts
That is mostly correct.  The point of the app is to alert nearby off-duty responders who wouldn't get the 911 alert, but the option to alert 911 will be a part of the work flow of the app.  The app could be used for a lot of situations but I think trying to help everyone is a bit of a lofty goal and anaphylaxis feels like a use case with the potential to do some of the most good.

Macabre   
Thanks for bringing up liability. I don't know much about Canadian law but I am talking to a lawyer who specializes in this good samaritan law in the USA.  The lawyer says that people could not be held liable for administering an epiPen but we have just started talking and I will keep you posted as I find out more.  From what I hear from the EMTs I talked to, there have been very few cases of good samaritans being sued and 0 cases of them being sued successfully.  I know that in an emergency there are potential risks to the responders on multiple fronts and Iím trying hard to find ways to mitigate those risks by looking at how other organizations, like 911, handle risk.   One consideration Iím weighing is to forget about people with eipPens and focus on responders who carry Benadryl or something similar.  I've talked to some EMTs about how they respond to anaphylaxis and they said the most important part or responding is to get the patient an anti-histamine, such as Benadryl, which doesnít carry the same liability since it is an over the counter drug.  Even if both of those ideas seem too risky though responders can still be protected by preforming first aid, CPR, and using an AED if necessary.
The app will be free to send and receive alerts.  Iíve come up with few potential ways of recovering my cost that I still need to vet, but I will not be selling user data or advertising on the app.  I don't have a food allergy.  Most of what I know about LTFA comes from my friends, people in the community, or personal research.  I've also taken 1st aid, CPR, and AED training which covered anaphylaxis.
That is interesting to know about the situation with the ER vs EMT.  Did the EMT know you had injected yourself?  I've heard that insurance companies always have to cover the cost of an ambulance in the USA.  I hate to ask about location information online and if you prefer you can PM me, but did the incident you described take place in Canada or the USA?
Thanks for sharing your story from universal studios.  My takeaway from that is that a map of places to replenish your epinephrine supply is going to be a critical feature.  The study you linked to is also interesting, Iím going to have to review this with my EMT friends to see why this is.  If you can think of anymore suggestions, comments, or questions I would love to hear them.

Sneaker
Thanks for mentioning that some people have special circumstances that prevent them from carrying an epiPen.  I can think of a few types of people, like my cousin, who would not be able to carry or administer their own medication.  I would love to spend a few moments brain storming with you about what kind of people would not be able to carry or administer their own epiPen? 

hedgehog
Good point about teenagers.  This may be a useful segment to focus on.  I'm going to look into this a lot more, especially because SilverLining brought up a good point earlier that this app may discourage people from carrying their epi.  If teens are already not carrying their epi with them this app could be useful, but if they are still carrying their epi most of the time I want to be sure that I'm not encouraging them to not carry their epi.
 
CMdeux
That is a great point.  I still don't know how I'm going to recover cost but I do hope that I can recover enough to reimburse people for using their epiPens.  It also came up in this thread that I should have a map of places where you would be able to get a new epiPen.  I know that doesnít alleviate all the tension from using your epi to help someone else so Iíll working on ways to mitigate the risks of the responders.  Thanks for the great link! Any chance you know of other stories like this?
Title: Re: App for Parents of Kids with Severe Allergies
Post by: Macabre on August 20, 2013, 09:50:28 AM
I am on Minnesota. No, insurance does not have to cover ambulance rides. Had I the ambulance company not "corrected" the bill mine would not have.

An ER map function could be helpful. But a map of where to get more epinephrine not so much. People k ow where to get their scripts filled. CM's question is about getting another script from a doctor, being able to get another Epi if insurance doesn't cover it (say you had just picked up your epis two days before using one on a stranger and your insurance won't cover new ones for 30 days. AND even with insurance some people have to pay $200 or more for their epis. With insurance.

So if you are going to use an Epi on a stranger, you could be leaving your child or yourself at risk. 


And frankly, I would have expected the developer of an app like this to know that.  And that's why I asked if you have a LTFA.
Title: Re: App for Parents of Kids with Severe Allergies
Post by: twinturbo on August 20, 2013, 09:56:07 AM
Listen to Macabre, Jim. I don't mean to be cruel but this exactly what your burden of market research is as a developer. Regarding the egg timer app--better hurry. My husband loved the idea enough to consider developing it himself, and he has brought medical devices to the market before.
Title: Re: App for Parents of Kids with Severe Allergies
Post by: CMdeux on August 20, 2013, 10:34:48 AM
Quote
I've talked to some EMTs about how they respond to anaphylaxis and they said the most important part or responding is to get the patient an anti-histamine, such as Benadryl, which doesnít carry the same liability since it is an over the counter drug.  Even if both of those ideas seem too risky though responders can still be protected by preforming first aid, CPR, and using an AED if necessary.

Okay-- setting aside for a moment the basic fact that this is bad advice from an EMT who really ought to know better...


I am going to echo Macabre's question here-- why don't YOU know better?

This is-- seriously-- just medically incorrect advice.  Period.

I do worry that this isn't much of a back up plan, and that the bottom line is that this probably isn't something that has much of a market-- and even if it does, that points up a problem in the way that our medical system manages and responds to, and teaches patients about... anaphylaxis.  Particularly FOOD anaphylaxis.

1.  Avoid allergen
2.  Know that 1. is never going to be fully achievable-- plan for mistakes to be made
3.  If you have a food allergy, you're at risk for anaphylaxis.
4.  If you are at risk of anaphylaxis, you MUST plan to manage anaphylaxis without warning at any time in the future-- period, full stop.

5. Management-- at a minimum-- requires you to carry and be prepared to administer a dose of epinephrine.


The other thing that I worry about with an 'app' like this is that this really does sort of make all of those accusations that we hear all the time... true.

You know, the ones where people complain that we are "expecting others to do it for us" and the like?  Well, carrying your own epinephrine doesn't get much more basic in terms of management.  It's not that I'm unsympathetic to people who have particular challenges in their lives when it comes to doing that... but... it's really not a negotiable item.  I worry that this kind of app could genuinely lead some people (even if it's only a few of them) to think that they "have it covered" when they don't.  The odds are VERY slim of actually finding epinephrine when you need it using this-- you're relying on voluntary compliance, and honestly, I would not sign up for this.  If I encounter a situation where I can clearly help (as the Hoffmans did) then OF COURSE, I would do so.  Just as I would give CPR or use an AED. 

I do NOT want my daughter to ever have the idea that someone else is going to bail her out.  Not ever. 

That's like writing an app for a diabetic to "find insulin by type."
Title: Re: App for Parents of Kids with Severe Allergies
Post by: Jim Sweet on August 20, 2013, 12:25:44 PM
Thanks for replying so quickly everyone.

Macabre:
Thanks for sharing your story.  Look like the information on my side was wrong.  And thanks for clarifying CMdeux's point.  It might be a good idea (though a lot of work to help) people get new prescriptions from their doctor and to have insurance kept in the loop or even greater yet, getting them to cover a new epi.  Even if it is impossible though, I think we have started to focus exclusively on the responders being people who are using their own epiPens to help others.  Responders will also be off-duty EMTs, medical practitioners, and other trained personnel who would not get the 911 alert.  I'm not trying to steer the conversation away but I felt that this clarification was worth mentioning again.

twinturbo
Thanks for the words of wisdom on market research.  Unfortunately I don't know of any other way to do market research other than to have the kind of conversations we are having here, which is why I really appreciate all of the open feedback from the community. I'm all ears if you have any pro-tips to share?

CMdeux
I only know what my sources tell me so thanks for correcting me.  I don't know if kids or adults would use this app an excuse to be unprepared but that is something I'm going to look into.
Title: Re: App for Parents of Kids with Severe Allergies
Post by: rebekahc on August 20, 2013, 12:38:51 PM
IMHO, it sounds to me like you have an idea for an app and you think it's awesome.  You have little to no real life experience with LTFA, but you've decided the LTFA niche market is where you should focus.  You seem to be trying to make our needs fit your idea of what we need (i.e. your product) rather than actually researching what could be viable tools for our community.  Square peg...round hole.

It also doesn't seem you've considered those on the other end of the app.  Why would they want to be at someone's beck and call when they're off duty?  If that were the case, it seems 911 dispatch would have already implemented a process whereby they could page or in some other way seek out nearest responder either on-duty or not.

Does Good Samaritan even apply to professionals (EMTs, doctors) or are they held to a higher standard increasing their liability over that of a layperson? 
Title: Re: App for Parents of Kids with Severe Allergies
Post by: Jim Sweet on August 20, 2013, 01:42:11 PM
Hi rebekahc
you're right in saying that I started with an idea and now I'm looking to see if/how it might be helpful.  I haven't decided anything yet and if this isn't an area where my app can be helpful then this isn't an area where my app can be helpful.  You would think 911 would have something like this in place but the fire departments I've talked with don't.  I don't think Good Samaritan applies to professional responders the same way it would to a non-professional (at the very least), but that is something I am still looking into since I'm not a lawyer.  I've gotten mixed feedback from professional responders in regards to their willingness to participate while off duty with most of the feedback on extreme ends.  Either people were 0% interested in responding or they were really excited to be responding. 
Title: Re: App for Parents of Kids with Severe Allergies
Post by: LinksEtc on August 20, 2013, 05:41:14 PM
Have you spoken with food allergy experts (organizations like FARE, leading allergists)?  This is not something where you want to be relying on information from a message board.

What if a baby is given an adult dose of epinephrine?  What if people use this who have not been diagnosed by an allergist ... for example, maybe they have a food intolerance, or maybe they have a mental disability?

Unless you get this product backed by an organization like FARE, it does not sit well with me.
Title: Re: App for Parents of Kids with Severe Allergies
Post by: maeve on August 20, 2013, 07:13:02 PM
Stumbled across this and thought it relevant to some of the discussion earlier in the thread.
http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/780414
Title: Re: App for Parents of Kids with Severe Allergies
Post by: GoingNuts on August 20, 2013, 09:55:38 PM
TT, what ER finder app do you use?
Title: Re: App for Parents of Kids with Severe Allergies
Post by: rebekahc on August 20, 2013, 10:53:08 PM
GN - I use the Around Me app.  I'm interested to hear if TT has a different/better one for me to explore...
Title: Re: App for Parents of Kids with Severe Allergies
Post by: twinturbo on August 20, 2013, 11:16:37 PM
findER
Find-ER

Two different apps similarly named. Of the two I use findER more often. Around New England - New York I used it more because the states and roads are less node-like as they are on the left coast.

Quote
Thanks for the words of wisdom on market research.  Unfortunately I don't know of any other way to do market research other than to have the kind of conversations we are having here, which is why I really appreciate all of the open feedback from the community. I'm all ears if you have any pro-tips to share?

Ain't your ears you need to use, my man. It's your wallet. No joke. Pro tips cost pro dollars. I know a fantastic consultant you could hire. He's rather attractive, too.
Title: Re: App for Parents of Kids with Severe Allergies
Post by: GoingNuts on August 21, 2013, 06:02:56 AM
Thanks ladies, I will check those out.  :thumbsup:
Title: Re: App for Parents of Kids with Severe Allergies
Post by: Jim Sweet on August 21, 2013, 08:31:10 AM
Hi LinksEtc
So far I've met with 2 food allergy organizations and hopefully I'll meet with a few more in the next 2 weeks.  They have been extremely helpful but I would say this message board has been really helpful as well  :)  I've reached out to FARE and some local allergist but I haven't heard back from them yet.  I'm going to follow-up with them next week though.  I'm still trying to work through all of the ways to mitigate the risks you mentioned but unfortunately nothing I've come up with seems to completely address all of those risks.
Title: Re: App for Parents of Kids with Severe Allergies
Post by: CMdeux on August 21, 2013, 10:55:02 AM
It just seems like the effort required to bring to market and promote this kind of app would be FAR better spent on better patient education (to address barriers to proper preparedness in some demographics-- and barriers to carrying epinephrine), and to promote better RECOGNITION of atypical anaphylaxis in first responders.

Otherwise you're generating a work-around to 911 that has some serious structural limitations.

Title: Re: App for Parents of Kids with Severe Allergies
Post by: SilverLining on August 21, 2013, 10:57:29 AM
Have you spoken with food allergy experts (organizations like FARE, leading allergists)?  This is not something where you want to be relying on information from a message board.

What if a baby is given an adult dose of epinephrine?  What if people use this who have not been diagnosed by an allergist ... for example, maybe they have a food intolerance, or maybe they have a mental disability?

Unless you get this product backed by an organization like FARE, it does not sit well with me.

Add to the what ifs.....what if a person thinks it's anaphylaxis and it is not?  What if they are having an anxiety attack?

It's one thing to take on that responsibility for yourself, your child, or a child in your care.  But to be on a call list specifically to respond, I think as an individual you would have to take some responsibility if you gave the epi in error.  Paramedics can check your pulse.  Maybe fire/police can as well?  But how many have the equipment in their home?

~~~~

I have had anxiety attacks that closely resembled anaphylaxis.  And it's not that uncommon.  When ds was training he responded to an emergency call and the patient was positive he was having an anaphylactic reaction because of something he ate.  He was wrong.  And epi was the last thing he needed.

~~~~

To answer your question, I'm not sure whether he sometimes stores his own bag, or always does.  Sometimes he drives his own car, so he would have a bag for that.  But, I'm not sure if he always keeps it, or just picks it up when he's got a job.  Other times (for example working a kids football game) they want an ambulance on-site so he drives it, and the supplies would be in the ambulance.  (The reason for wanting an on-site ambulance is to save the time of waiting for 9-1-1 to respond, especially if they are not close, and it's a high risk for injury.)
Title: Re: App for Parents of Kids with Severe Allergies
Post by: Sneaker on August 26, 2013, 12:15:30 AM
Hi, Sorry that I have not posted again till now.  I have been busy and also new to posting here.  I have been reading all the posts though.

Jim:  To answer your question.  I will have to let you know if I will brainstorm about what type of people would not carry or administer their own Epipen. 

Also, I still do not know how this app could or would work, but I am thinking mainly as a backup or secondary plan for my teen.
Title: Re: App for Parents of Kids with Severe Allergies
Post by: twinturbo on September 02, 2013, 12:03:39 PM
Sorry to necro a dormant thread but I'm adding two new apps to my roster: MedicAlert's prEMISE & eTrak. MedicAlert is offering a GPS product with panic button to use with their monitoring system. You can not only trak but set the radius to auto-alert parents when the tracker leaves the preset area.

For example: I set radius around the school, if the tracker leaves the area I get a text alerting me. No more surprise field trips into remote woods which has happened before. If DS1 wants to contact us for any reason it's possible to relay through MedicAlert with a 2 second button push.

Where this is all going to fit in with the gold standard EAP, protocols TBD. We also plan to submit this as a medical expense come tax time.

I should probably denote I purchased the MedicAlert eTrak so we're testing it out now.
Title: Re: App for Parents of Kids with Severe Allergies
Post by: CMdeux on September 02, 2013, 01:01:17 PM
Ahhh-- interesting, TT.


Title: Re: App for Parents of Kids with Severe Allergies
Post by: twinturbo on September 06, 2013, 12:21:24 PM
DH and I are exploring the eTrak monitoring via app and website. The GPS works great and the interface provides what one would want to see like location, address, battery life-definitely not too busy or overdelivery of information. What needs work is the difference in limitation between the web interface and mobile app for realtime updates. Also exploring settings affecting battery life for school use.

Teachers and school have been receptive to the device. Because its failsafe is to call law enforcement if no one can be reached when activated I told them use it if you need it for anything. Not as a replacement but if that's all you've got or whatever use it.
Title: Re: App for Parents of Kids with Severe Allergies
Post by: twinturbo on September 17, 2013, 02:10:49 PM
Thus far we've had some unacceptable issues with the eTrak devices. I've been in talks with MedicAlert's marketing to address this business-to-business because it needs resolution via internal channels. Hopefully MedicAlert will iron this out with eTrak to let them know they will have to step up technical support for their service to MedicAlert customers who are unlike the majority of their other customer base. Unless the unit is linked to the MedicAlert service a key component is unusable: the ability for MedicAlert to monitor and follow through on emergency activation.

Update: MedicAlert Consumer Relations followed up with me this afternoon. We revisited the support plan eTrak is providing MedicAlert where I made the suggestion that, even at the cost of price point, that eTrak should build into its response protocol a way to immediately flag a MedicAlert customer maybe even moving to a separate call line for us, or some sort of internal way to flag us as a medical priority. In the next couple of weeks what I assume are the managers for this service to get together to review their contract. Supposedly they plan to amend the service contract to resolve a fasttrack system for MedicAlert.

I should note that the MedicAlert GPS is a product powered by eTrak GPS combined with an additional monitoring linked to MedicAlert. You get a small black "panic button" device with a single button. A one second push force updates the device. A two second push triggers a silent alarm that sends text messages and/or emails to designated phones (usually parents, whatever you program). MedicAlert also immediately calls designated parties, if no parties can be reached EMS/law enforcement is called in by MedicAlert to that GPS' location.
Title: Re: App for Parents of Kids with Severe Allergies
Post by: twinturbo on September 26, 2013, 11:41:55 AM
Update for this week.

We're on our third device. The web tracking in a browser is fine and I think finally the battery issue has been taken care of. The update for iOS 7 has knocked the Apple app out of commission to track the device. Android app tracking was unaffected therefore still working. The engineers at eTrak have been on fixing the iOS app for a while hopefully it will get resolved soon.

DH and I are going another round with MedicAlert management once the app is sorted out. Right now we have to stay on eTrak (who makes the device) to make sure it has full functionality. At this point unless you're willing to stick through the early stages of debug and you just happen to have an experienced engineer/product marketing manager on hand (DH) I can't recommend the product quite yet.

MedicAlert portion of the service is great. eTrak needs to step up its game. It is getting there. It's a new service for this product so we fully expected to work through this. I truly feel a very worthy, dependable service will be on the other end of the early debug.
Title: Re: App for Parents of Kids with Severe Allergies
Post by: LinksEtc on April 24, 2014, 05:27:17 PM
"New App Seeks to Connect Those Carrying Their Epi Injectors with Those Who Left Them Home"
http://asthmaallergieschildren.com/2014/04/24/new-app-seeks-to-connect-those-carrying-their-epi-injectors-with-those-who-left-them-home/

Quote
The brainchild of young American entrepreneurs Jim Sweet and Joe Friedman, AppiPen will connect those who are not carrying with those that are within a practical radius.
Title: Re: App for Parents of Kids with Severe Allergies
Post by: sneaker on April 29, 2014, 11:11:32 AM
Glad to see a new post on this app topic.  LinksEtc, thanks for posting the news.

I continue to have an interest in this app for my teen.