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Author Topic: A reason why you should NOT rely on first responders for EPI  (Read 1681 times)

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Offline CMdeux

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  • -- but sometimes the voices have good ideas!
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22712745


Some pretty scary features in that survey, particularly for those of us with older kids that don't present with typical anaphylaxis.

Our allergist warned us several years ago that we should make SURE that we've given DD epi before paramedics show up.  Don't give them the decision, I think were his words.  Pretty clear why he felt that way.   :-/
Resistance isn't futile.  It's voltage divided by current. 

Western U.S.

twinturbo

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Re: A reason why you should NOT rely on first responders for EPI
« Reply #1 on: April 10, 2013, 10:55:14 AM »
In our present area only full paramedics can administer pediatric epinephrine anyhow. And if anyone needed further incentive our last EMT (we're on the freuqent user multipass don't you know) shared that he read a recent study that autoinjectors disperse epinephrine more effectively than the typical syringe with epinephrine EMS uses. He asked that I bring them with us in the truck even though there was a paramedic on board.

By the way our teachers were completely unaware that for field trips outside of our city boundary they would not be able to assume calling an ambulance meant they would summon the appropriate level medic legally able to use pediatric epinephrine. I only knew because I looked into it. At this point I take enough injectors and diphenhydramine to deliver mutiple doses in the ER if necessary. I learned that one the hard way.
« Last Edit: April 11, 2013, 07:28:52 AM by twinturbo »

Offline Macabre

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Re: A reason why you should NOT rely on first responders for EPI
« Reply #2 on: April 10, 2013, 11:00:46 AM »
Oh thank you!!! This is what I was looking for last week. The very thing.
Me: Sesame, shellfish, chamomile, sage
DS: Peanuts

Offline ajasfolks2

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Re: A reason why you should NOT rely on first responders for EPI
« Reply #3 on: April 10, 2013, 11:25:48 AM »
This is super important as relates to part of a line-item for "Emergency Reaction Plan" as part of 504 Plan in school:

ALWAYS send the student in the transport with the unused epi(s) so he/she may use as needed!

 
Is this where I blame iPhone and cuss like an old fighter pilot's wife?

**(&%@@&%$^%$#^%$#$*&      LOL!!   

Offline yelloww

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Re: A reason why you should NOT rely on first responders for EPI
« Reply #4 on: April 10, 2013, 11:27:01 AM »
That's not too surprising really.

Our local volunteer medics don't have it on board either. We are supposed to stab first, call 911,then if a second one is needed in the ambulance, I have to do it... Or they can put it in D's hand, wrap their hand around his and administer the second dose.

Offline LinksEtc

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Re: A reason why you should NOT rely on first responders for EPI
« Reply #5 on: June 04, 2014, 12:26:55 PM »
FARE webinar about EMS/911 issues

-----------

Also, just putting article title for link in top post:

"Anaphylaxis knowledge among paramedics: results of a national survey."

Prehosp Emerg Care. 2012 Oct-Dec;16(4):527-34. doi: 10.3109/10903127.2012.689931. Epub 2012 Jun 19.



« Last Edit: June 04, 2014, 12:33:07 PM by LinksEtc »

Offline LinksEtc

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Re: A reason why you should NOT rely on first responders for EPI
« Reply #6 on: July 24, 2014, 12:42:04 PM »
Tweeted by @IgECPD

"Epinephrine use and outcomes in anaphylaxis patients transported by emergency medical services."
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25043626

Quote
The objectives of this study are to (1) determine the frequency of epinephrine administration in EMS-transported patients with allergic complaints, (2) identify predictors of epinephrine administration, and (3) determine frequency of emergency department (ED) epinephrine administration after EMS transport.